About Elston Chapel

About Elston Chapel

This small and unassuming chapel has a more interesting history than might first appear. The earliest mention of Elston is in Domesday Book as Elvestune, or Eilaf’s settlement. The settlement was divided into three holdings, each with its own church.

The ancient origin of Elston and this chapel is evident in the Norman doorway on the south side of the church. However, most of the building dates from the 14th to the 16th centuries.

The manor at Elston changed hands many times during the Middle Ages and came into the possession of the Darwin family in the 1680s. Elston chapel was regularly used as a parish church until 1870, when its parish was united with that of nearby Stoke.

To download more about the chapel follow the link: Elston Chapel - Your Church Tour

Elston Old Chapel History

Elston Old Chapel History

Although neither a church nor a chapel are mentioned in Domesday, it was recorded that ‘Norman the priest’ held land at Elston from Roger de Bulli. J C Cox directly associated this entry in Domesday with Elston Old Chapel, asserting that the priest ‘doubtless’ served at the chapel here, but this could apply equally to the parish church.

The earliest part of the building, the round arched south doorway with bold zig-zag moulding, has been dated to the twelfth-century.

To find out more about the diocese follow this link

Elston All Saints History

Elston is a village of over 600 inhabitants situated just five miles south-west of the market town of Newark and a similar distance southeast of Southwell. The village is most famous for being the home of the Darwin family, which has produced several notable natural scientists, since the 17th century. The village is also notable as since early times it has had two churches, a result of the village being divided into two parishes.

Domesday Book mentions a priest called Norman holding lands at Elston and that another landholder, Ilbert de Lacy, was making a claim for the ‘priest’s land’ against Bishop Remegius – though what priest isn’t mentioned. It seems probable though that a church was already there in the village, a pre-Conquest structure most likely, that may have formed the basis for one of the later churches in the village. The next mention of a church in Elston is of a tragic incident. Gabriel d’Eylston (Elston), son of Ralph, of a family of knights, was struck by lightning and killed while on the church porch. The date of his death is not known exactly, but was around the late 12th century or early 13th century. However this may have been Elston Chapel, which seems to have been the first of the two churches in Elston to be built from architectural evidence, during the 12th century.

To find out more about the diocese follow this link

All Saints Parish

All Saints' church  is much more, than just the building. It is the people who gather for worship here today; people from the village and the surrounding area who come to express their faith in God - the Creator, Redeemer and Sustainer - in word and in song; who come and are nourished in that faith by Word and Sacrament.

To find out more about the parish follow this link